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OUR MEDIA

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OUR VIDEOS

An Introduction to Corruption Analysis

We believe corruption analysis is a vital first step for all practitioners working in anti-corruption.  This 2023 video walks you through what is corruption analysis, what it is not and how it can be used.  We hope this video offers a clear explanation of why corruption analysis is at the heart of our approach to all of our projects.  Presented by CJL’s Co-Director, Cheyanne Scharbatke-Church, and Senior Advisor, Peter Woodrow, this resource aims to provide a clear first look at the approach that can be watched on the go or in-between workflows.

Corruption, Justice, and Fragile States

Our systems approach was tested through original research in the criminal justice sectors in the Central African Republic, Uganda, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It ultimately creates actionable analyses that enable policymakers and practitioners to identify leverage points, develop strategic collaborations, test theories of change, and avoid unintentional harm. This video was made by CJL in 2017.

Most Significant Change: Webinar

Just Governance Group presents our latest Round Table event Most Significant Change: Evaluation of VAWG Prevention and Anticorruption Initiatives Webinar Featuring guest speaker Sara Siebert and Cheyanne Scharbatke-Church held on June 4th 2020. Sara Siebert, VAWG prevention specialist with 23 years of work experience and a Master’s in Public Health. She has implemented the Raising Voices’ SASA! methodology for VAWG prevention, and has been in a leadership role to several SASA! adaptations worldwide. She currently collaborates with Raising Voices and Beyond Borders. In the discussion Sara will share lessons learned from Haiti. Cheyanne Scharbatke-Church, Executive Director of Besa Global and Co-director of Besa's Corruption, Justice and Legitimacy Program, specialized in evaluation, measurement, learning and program design in settings affected by conflict or endemic corruption. In this discussion Cheyanne shares lessons from the DRC.

OECD Highlights Reel

The Corruption, Justice and Legitimacy Program in partnership with Accountability Lab South Africa hosted a session at the OECD Global Anti-Corruption and Integrity Forum on April 1, 2022. This video is a short highlights reel from the full version. The full session is also on this webpage and our YouTube channel. The session provided steps one needs to take to identify and mitigate each type of corruption threat and its capacity to undermine governance and social cohesion. This framework is derived from a vast literature review on how to adapt anti-corruption programming in FCAS.

Anti-Corruption in Fragile, Conflict, and Violent Settings

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Focused on the critical intersections of conflict, corruption, and social norms: the main panels and sessions of the Anticorruption for Development (AC4D) Global Forum: Restoring Trust were all recorded, including one featuring our very own Co-Director, Cheyanne Scharbatke-Church. The 2023 Forum was hosted by the World Bank’s Governance Global Practice, and co-hosted by Transparency International; UNODC; U4 Anti-Corruption Resource Centre; Chandler Foundation; USAID, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) and the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Why Every Development Practitioner Needs to Re-Think their Take on Corruption

The Corruption, Justice and Legitimacy Program in partnership with Accountability Lab South Africa hosted a session at the OECD Global Anti-Corruption and Integrity Forum on April 1, 2022. The session provided steps one needs to take to identify and mitigate each type of corruption threat and its capacity to undermine governance and social cohesion. This framework is derived from a vast literature review on how to adapt anti-corruption programming in FCAS.

Understanding Social Norms

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The anti-corruption field is highly multidisciplinary, and it is important for practitioners to know that they must engage with multiple areas of society, including the political, social, and economic sectors. CJL recognizes this fact and focuses on the underexamined relationship between corruption and social norms. By advancing knowledge in this area, we can lead to the creation of more effective anti-corruption programming. In a recent interview with Faculti, Diana Chigas discussed social norms and how they relate to corruption and anti-corruption. She also delves into the definition of social norms, making this a great resource for those not already acquainted with the field. Her explanation of the origin, proliferation and purpose of social norms makes this interview a valuable watch for beginners and experienced practitioners alike.

Video
Podcasts
OUR PODCASTS

The Intersection of Corruption and Security

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Security and anti-corruption are generally considered to be different sectors, but there is a deep connection between corruption and insecurity in conflict-affected states.  Although the dominant approach today is to address conflict before attempting to solve corruption, this has the consequence of more deeply embedding corruption into the state’s institutions in peacetime. In this Securityscape podcast episode, CJL’s Co-Director Cheyanne Scharbatke-Church and Security Sector Advisor Blair Ashford discuss the implications of corruption on security in conflict-affected states.  Here are a few snippets from the conversation; - Conflict can create new social norms within institutions that exert intense social, economic, and political pressure on individuals to engage in or excuse corrupt behaviour. - The hierarchies present in military and police forces are intended to enforce discipline, but they may also lead to institutionalized corruption that is difficult to combat. - This corruption is often money-related but may also take the form of nepotism or sextortion.

Social Norms in Anti-Corruption Programming

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Our Co-Directors, Cheyanne Scharbatke-Church and Diana Chigas sat down with the Fletcher Forum of World Affairs Podcast to discuss our mission of shifting social norms from the periphery to a central component of corruption analysis and anti-corruption strategy. This podcast gives an insight into what prompted our journey into the world of social norms and how we are working on developing approaches, tools, and materials to address social norms that influence corrupt behavior. You can listen to the podcast here: Why should anti-corruption programming engage with social norms? Fletcher Forum of World Affairs is a student-managed foreign policy journal at The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. The publication provides a broad, interdisciplinary platform for analysis of legal, political, economic, environmental, and diplomatic issues in international affairs.

Social Norms Approaches to Anti-Corruption

Our co-directors, Cheyanne Scharbatke-Church and Diana Chigas were recently interviewed by Matthew Stephenson for KickBack: The Global Anticorruption Podcast managed by the Interdisciplinary Corruption Research Network. This podcast gives you an insight into what drove Cheyanne and Diana to focus on corruption after spending decades working on peacebuilding interventions. The conversation then dives into what prompted CJL’s journey into the world of social norms and how we are working on developing approaches, tools, and materials to address social norms that influence corrupt behavior.

Conflict and Corruption

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Cheyanne Scharbatke-Church and Diana Chigas appeared in a recent episode of the Securityscape podcast, hosted by the Centre for Military, Security and Strategic Studies at the University of Calgary. In this episode, our Co-Directors discuss how corruption and conflict reinforce each other, creating a vicious cycle that is difficult to break. Conflict creates a climate where corruption is less likely to be discovered and punished, and money generated through corrupt avenues frequently fuels violence. Anti-corruption cannot be an afterthought in such situations and instead must be an ongoing effort employed in tandem with conflict resolution.

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