Pilfering the Peace: the nexus between corruption and peacebuilding

Corruption and Peacebuilding

By the Life and Peace Institute

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Pilfering the Peace explores the issues at the nexus of corruption, conflict, and peacebuilding in a short and accessible manner.  Written over a decade ago, this volume of the Life & Peace Institute journal series – New Routes –  pulls together insightful analysis grounded in examples from Burundi, Liberia, the Caucasus, Lebanon, Colombia, and the DRC, among others.  The material has aged well, as it continues to serve as a compass for practitioners, donors, and scholars alike in understanding and shaping programs responsive to the multi-dimensional relationships between conflict, corruption, peacebuilding, and anti-corruption.


This volume explores themes such as: how corruption acts as a driver of conflict; why peacebuilders can and should address corruption; the tensions between tolerating corruption to achieve peace agreements in the short-run and undermining positive peace in the long-run; which anti-corruption tools might be most applicable to post-conflict contexts; and the conflict-sensitivity of anti-corruption work.


Journal articles by: Raymond June, Nathaniel Heller, Michael Johnston, Peter Uvin, Gaelle Kibranian, Daniel Friedman, Matt Herbert, Phyllis Dininio, Oscar Bloh, Ambrose James, Amy Margolies, and Corinna Kreidler.


While not a product of the Corruption, Justice and Legitimacy Program, it was edited by our co-director Cheyanne Scharbatke-Church.